Monday, February 29, 2016

PvP vs Raiding

Tis a question that is older than time itself, which is better in WoW: PvP or PvE?
There are pros and cons to each but just so you know coming in I am a PvP player.

So this is an odd question because you're comparing two very different play styles  that are not always comparable. Raiding is very progression based, clearing boss after boss in a linear progression with your guild. Unless you are a very hardcore guild that does mythic archimonde an hour after WoD was released, then raiding is a very predictable process. The gear is achieved via progression as well, to the point of raiding being a chore. Raiding also has ties to the lore and is a big way for Blizz to continue the story.

Then you look at PvP which is the EXACT opposite. PvP is about going into a que and having to be flexible due to your lack of knowledge of what your team, and the enemy team´s, comp are. Sure, you know you're gonna have a few tanks and a handful of healers, but as to what type, you damage type, how many rogues you have, etc are all a mystery. Personally I really enjoy this aspect, however I have met plenty of people who find it fairly annoying. You also have world PvP that I tend to ignore, simply because it doesn't happen that often or, when it does, itś typically a gank of some sort. You also have Ashran, but no one really likes Ashran so letś just pretend it doesn't exist. You have arenas which provide less team play and more individual skill. If you want the team coordination of a raid but in PvP, challenge a guild and get your buddies together then voila, fun for the whole guild. This all being said PvP does have pretty unfair balancing. Rogues are practically designed for this and any class with stealth will automatically do better than one who does not.

A lot of this comes down to opinion so i´m going to ask, which do you prefer, Raiding or PvP?

Friday, February 26, 2016

(WOW) Class Halls:Hunter


So yesterday we looked at a rather disappointing class hall, we may as well finish up with the disappointments. So without further delay: Trueshot Lodge.


Ironically, like druid, I have a bm hunter as my second main and am very partial to the class. That being said, I was expecting a little more out of this.


I´ĺl admit theŕe are some good things about this class hall. It fits thematically and as far as convenience goes it is the class hall that is closest to where we will be questing(which makes sense given that hunters don't tend to have magic teleporting pets(although we should.).


However, as I said earlier, I was expecting something much more out of this place. Itś convenient, yes, but it's not really the kinda place you would use to, ya know, SAVE THE WORLD, or anything. I can somewhat excuse the dreamgrove because there's not an obvious way to make it awesome but all blizzard had to do was put the hall in a dangerous place in nature. Cliff faces, deep caves, mountain areas, beast dens, all of these would have been amazing and already exist in WoW and none were used. Very disappointed Blizzard.


Very disappointed.
Hunter<-------You are here
Demon Hunter(Coming later)
Death Knight(Coming Later)
Priest(Coming Later)
Paladin (Coming Later)
Rouge(Coming Later)
Warlock(Coming Later)
Mage(Coming Later)
Shaman<-------You are here
Druid(Coming Later)
Hunter(Coming Later)
Demon Hunter(Coming Later)
Death Knight(Coming Later)
Priest(Coming Later)
.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

(WOW) Class Halls-Druid

So after covering the Shamans’ and the Warriors’ class halls, we’ll move onto my main role:Druid. For those of you who don’t know, one of my mains is a leafy leaf green green druid(Resto) and I'm very partial to her. That being said I have a few complaints about the Druid class hall.  


IT
IS
SO
BORING.


Really, I don’t even need to show pictures of it to tell you, there is just nothing magnificent about it. There’s a few statue around the place and a tree house with a cave nearby. That’s it. That’s not me trying to say it’s not thematic, it certainly is druid like, but it just feels like it’s Moonglade 2.0. I suppose it’s kinda cool it's sorta near the Emerald Dream but that isn't represented anywhere that I could find.


I suppose maybe the druid mechanic will make up for location but we don't even know what is yet, so I can´t make that judgement.


(Below:only cool part about the dreamgrove)


Druid<-------You are here
Hunter(Coming Tomorrow)
Demon Hunter(Coming Later)
Death Knight(Coming Later)
Priest(Coming Later)
Paladin (Coming Later)
Rouge(Coming Later)
Warlock(Coming Later)
Mage(Coming Later)
Warrior
Shaman<-------You are here
Druid(Coming Later)
Hunter(Coming Later)
Demon Hunter(Coming Later)
Death Knight(Coming Later)
Priest(Coming Later)
Paladin (Coming Later)
Rouge(Coming Later)
Warlock(Coming Later)
Mage(Coming Later)

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

(WOW) Class order halls-Shaman

Moving past the halls of valor we’ll take a look at the next class hall: Shaman’s


This is another hall that looks absolutely gorgeous and really is just cool. However unlike the halls of valor, this is cool almost purely by design as opposed to location( although I will admit, maelstrom’s pretty cool). The idea of four areas dedicated to the elements is, put frankly, amazing and each has it’s own unique feel to it.
(Note: Image from an earlier state and more effects have been added.)
We’ll start out with the air hall...cave….thing. This is possibly one of the most beautiful with gusts of wind blowing as white lines. The circle of elements is a nice touch although it will probably have some kind of mechanic tied in with it.

The water/ earth cave bit is equally as beautiful, with waves crashing into the side and pools of glamorous puddles surrounding the area. However there isn’t much in this room at the moment, so i’m excited to see what they do in this room.

The fire section seems a little underwhelming to me. It has the honor of holding the battle map and contains a floating ball of magma….stuff. There might be some lore context for that but I couldn’t find any.

Overall a great feeling order hall with a location that should feel satisfying to shaman players.

Shaman<-------You are here
Druid(Coming Later)
Hunter(Coming Later)
Demon Hunter(Coming Later)
Death Knight(Coming Later)
Priest(Coming Later)
Paladin (Coming Later)
Rouge(Coming Later)
Warlock(Coming Later)
Mage(Coming Later)

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

(WOW) Clase Order Halls-Warrior

Given the recent look at class order halls in the Legion alpha, I figured i’d take a look at each and give my honest opinion. So let’s go down the list in order, so here’s the warrior.
Holy
Crap
I wish I played warrior.


Ironically I hate to start out with what I think is probably the best hall out of the lot. There is just so much right with this place, the skyline, the golden-plated beasts-for guards walking around, the feasting hall,ODIN HIMSELF, and not to mention the over all golden theme that spreads throughout the hall. I was originally worried that it would look to close to the paladin style, but Blizzard really managed to give it it’s own feel.

Also if you don’t know, Blizzard is adding in different mechanics into (most likely all of) the order halls. For instance, warriors will have a pit to do 1v1 pvp in and likely gain some form of reward for doing so. This is an amazing idea by itself and, once all the details are added, i’m sure the arena will be as amazing as the rest of the zone.

Warrior<-------You are here

Shaman(Coming today)
Druid(Coming Later)
Hunter(Coming Later)
Demon Hunter(Coming Later)
Death Knight(Coming Later)
Priest(Coming Later)
Paladin (Coming Later)
Rouge(Coming Later)
Warlock(Coming Later)
Mage(Coming Later)

Monday, February 22, 2016

I don't have time to write articles everyday, so when I come short here's what will replace it:The Quote of the Day!



Ok, yes it's and has been used 100 times before but hey, if it works it works.




Source

Sunday, February 21, 2016

Love in Violence

Have you ever realized how much we love violence?


Stop and think for a moment, how many of your favorite media includes some form of physical conflict or straight up bloodshed? Think of how ingrained it is into our cultures to love the idea of an epic sword fight or a massive tank battle. Then ask yourself, is this really the culture we want to develop in?


Scientists have long since studied the rewarding effects watching violence has on our brain, corresponding to the same basic needs as sex, food and shelter. “This serves a very useful evolutionary role but a propensity toward aggression is not beneficial and can be a problem.”( Jeanna Bryner,Livescience Managing Editor) This base need to pursue violence has been kept long past it’s evolutionary use and causes many problems in a modern cultured society.


This is the reason why so many action fans go to see hits such as “Die hard” or “Goldeneye”. This adrenaline rich dopamine rush to our brains is so effective it has even made action movies one of the top grossing in the world with horror at a close 3rd (Movie Genres That Make The Most Money By Michael Deane).

I see this as a massive problem, especially in American society.  We have become so obsessed with these ideas that we begin seeking them outside of our media.  This is not to say that we don’t have action and conflict in our media, that is a near necessity, all I ask is that we begin to move our focus away from the flying bullets and more towards stories that question  human morality or integrate more intelligent aspects of the world we live in.

Friday, February 19, 2016

On the Effects of Imperialism
Chase A. Keener
© 2016 Chase Keener


































In the from the beginning of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th century Europe and the U.S experienced a radical Nationalist movement causing them to begin the period we now know as the age of imperialism. This period had a profound impact on the people of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Imperialism brought new philosophies pertaining mostly to economics and politics that changed the life of all citizens.


Cecil Rhodes is possibly the perfect example of British Imperialism. In his lifetime he managed to create the largest diamond monopoly that is still in place to day, simultaneously abusing the populus for his own gain. In the first hand account of “The Diamond Fields of South Africa” by Anthony Trollope he personally describes the diamond mines as “Very mean to the eye” and mentions that the “Kafirs(Africans) are working for 10s a week.”(Doc 1). He describes the area as very uninhabitable, along with the fact that the workers are only getting paid an exceptionally small amount of money. This is the first blatant abuse of power from Europe’s countries and shows a repeating theme in the story of imperialism-Abuse of a people for material gain.


Picture Above-De Beers mining town, 1873 (doc 2)


The effects of imperialism are still resonating in world today, good and bad. An example of the later begins in 1916 when the Belgians arrive in in Africa. They immediately after arriving put in a large social contrast between the Hutus and the Tutsis and “animosity between them has grown substantially since the colonial period.”(Doc 3) The Tutsis got higher paying jobs and better education, pushing the barrier between the groups farther apart. This cause great social tension up until April 7 1994, when a the group of Hutus took arms and vowed to murder every Tutsis they could find.  


Perhaps the greatest casualty of imperialism, the ancient Chinese empire fell beneath the roaring  wave as well. China and Britain had always had a troubled relationship. However when Britain purposefully tried to get china addicted to opium, a drug manufactured in their asian colonies, it was the straw that broke the camel's back. Even after Lin Zexu wrote a letter begging queen Victoria to stop opium trade, “should these foreigners send in return a poisonous drug?”(Doc 5) This caused what we now call the Opium wars, which was fought between China and Britain over a short period of time. The end result was that Britain had emerged as a clear victor and forced China to sign a unequal trade agreement, leasing large spheres of influence over to Britain and causing several other Eurasian nations to do the same









































  • Doc 1-(Anthony Trollope, “The Diamond FIelds of South Africa,”1870)
  • Doc 2- (De Beers Group, “Mines”, 1873)
  • Doc 3 - (Rwanda:how the Genocide Happened, BBC new report, April 1, 2004)
  • Doc 5- (The chinese repository VOL 8)

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Chase A. Keener
CP English 10
2-15-16


Teachers are never perfect, nor contented
Why do we teach Shakespeare?  The question may seem obvious or stupid at first glance, but stop and dwell on it for a moment. This is exactly what english teacher Dana Dusbiber asked when she made the imbecilic decision removed Shakespeare from her curriculum. This has stirred up a large amount of controversy, especial she released a public article about her decision.  In her article she mainly defends her point by saying that  teachers are professional who should be willing and even driven, to change common core and speaks strongly against using.  While this is a mere opinion, this angered Matthew Truesdale enough to write back a separate article explaining why he believes it should be taught in the classroom.  He believes that Shakespeare’s plays do tell a diverse cultural story and is therefore extremely relevant to ethnically diverse students.


As a fan of classic literature, I see a different problem. Are we asking if Shakespeare should be taught or are we asking if classic literature should be taught? Should we merely teach Shakespeare’s confusing, sometimes vulgar Elizabethan language with Othello or Hamlet and scare them away from anything with a classic label forever or do we introduce them to much more manageable bits of, say, Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The latter of which has inspired a multitude of modern media production that slower paced students can reference if they have trouble understanding the material and still provides an absorbing and inclining challenge for excelling students. Dusbiber makes very clear in her article that she wants to offer “Ethnically diverse literature” to her students. Why not then teach another one of Verne’s classics, Around the World in 80 days which provides a rich abundance of other cultures in it’s story.


In her article Dusbiber speaks passionately that “Why not teach translations of early writings or oral storytelling from Latin America or Southeast Asia other parts of the world? Many, many of our students come from these languages and traditions. Why do our students not deserve to study these “other” literatures with equal time and value?” While the trust in her goal is admirable, it is without solid ground. By saying this she is presuming that by studying literature from other cultures will cause her students to care anymore about the material their reading. At least as an english when I hear legendary names like Verne, Dickens and Tale of Two Cities I get excited out of shear bragging rights at least. However trying to brag about learning  Swahili literature won’t get anyone much praise.


Meanwhile,Truesdaleś argument is rather lackluster as well but has much more substance than Dusbiber. He sayś almost immediately that ¨I don’t do it because I feel beholden to any set of expectations or standards(to teach Shakespeare)–I do it because I want my students to have the experience of reading it…that’s it, and that’s all.¨ One could look at this as a convincing reason for why Shakespeare is a viable teaching option or one could look at this as evidence of the dictatorship the Shakespeare has on classic literature. Mr. Truesdales, and many other teachers, seem to think that if one teach classics in the classroom it has to Shakespeare.


If anyone would happen to come by and read this article, I beseech that when considering classic literature put it into a state of open mind and equality. One must not take care to not only think about the Vernes and Austin’s but to view them as equal to Hamlet and Macbeth.  If a teacher prefers Shakespeare to Dickens that is within their right to hold that opinion but they do not have the right to deny that experience from their students just because they hold personal bias.